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Humphrey Lyttelton And His Band - Humph At The Conway FLAC album


Performer: Humphrey Lyttelton And His Band
Genre: Jazz
Title: Humph At The Conway
Country: UK
Released: 1954
FLAC version ZIP size: 1955 mb
MP3 version ZIP size: 1205 mb
WMA version ZIP size: 1456 mb
Rating: 4.3
Votes: 609
Other Formats: AUD RA XM ASF MP3 AA APE

This one went into the hit parade and made Humph famous just at the time when the Trad Jazz boom was under way but for what ever reason one will never know Humph was already showing his tendancy towards more mainstream approach (by the inclusion of the sax into his front line) financially this was a huge blunder on his part coz everyone. Anyway that is history Humph made great contributions to Jazz: Trad, Mainstream, Modern and Swing. Furthermore his contributions in cartoonery (is that a word) in which he worked with Trao (Wally Fawkes), calligraphy he was elected president of the Society for Italic Handwriting, radio broadcasting the BBC gave him his own BBC series, The Best of Jazz, which he helmed for over four decades. Six years later, he was also appointed host of the spoof panel game I'm Sorry, I Haven't a Clue, a program notorious for its abundance of double entendres.

This was Humph's 1954 band at its very best. The set wis ras recorded at one of the band's regular monthly concerts at Conway Hall, Red Lion Square, London. The venue was somewhat unusual in that it was not primarily intended for music,but was normally used by an organisation called the South Place Ethical Society, who held meetings and lectures there. The recording was produed by none other than George (later Sir George) Martin, who was destined to become famous for his association with the Beatles. The soloists are all at the top of their form. Humph's intro on I Double Dare You sets the mood perfectly. Wally Plays the Blues is one of the most relaxed and charming clarinet solos ever, while Johnny Parker's original, Feline Stomp, marks him out as one of the most exciting of trad pianists.

Humphrey Richard Adeane Lyttelton (23 May 1921 – 25 April 2008), also known as Humph, was an English jazz musician and broadcaster from the aristocratic Lyttelton family. Having taught himself the trumpet at school, Lyttelton became a popular figure of the trad jazz revival, leading his own eight-piece band, which recorded a hit single, "Bad Penny Blues", in 1956.

Humphrey Lyttelon and His Band with Marie Knight 1958. Humph at the Conway, Jazz at the Royal Festival Hall.

Delving Back and Forth With Humph - Студийный альбом от Humphrey Lyttelton and His Band. Вышел Неизвестно В альбом вошло 17 треков. Продолжительность альбома: 57:02. Humphrey Lyttelton and His Band. Low Down Dirty Shame Blues.

Songs from Humph At The Conway by Humphrey Lyttelton, Humphrey Lyttelton & His Band. Free download and listen Humph At The Conway. Humphrey Lyttleton and His Band.

Title: MEMPHIS SHAKE Artist: HUMPHREY LYTTELTON & HIS BAND Composer: Hayes Publisher: Mills Music Ltd Album: Humph At the Conway Label: Encore Number: ENC 164. 2. Title: SWING OUT Artist: HUMPHREY LYTTELTON & HIS BAND Composer: Allen/Higginbotham Publisher: Southern Album: A Tribute to Humph-Volume 8 Label: Dormouse Number: DM14. 3. Title: KATH MEETS HUMPH Artist: HUMPHREY LYTTELTON & HIS BAND Composer: Lyttelton Publisher: Mecolico Album: Kath Meets Humph Label: Parlophone Number: PMD 1052. 8. Title: SAD SWEET SONG Artist: HUMPHREY LYTTELTON & HIS BAND Composer: Humphrey Lyttelton Album: Sad, Sweet Songs and Crazy Rhythms Label: Calligraph Number: CLGCD 042. Back to the top.

Almost seven-years before, in 1954, Lyttelton recorded his first ever live album at the Conway Hall in London's Red Lion Square - released as Humph at the Conway, it stands as one of the era's most enjoyable records, but it was also very much a child of its own time. By 1961, much had changed: a new band, a new approach, a new instrumental lineup and a newfound appreciation for kicking the old trad rules into touch, and blasting out a 'freer' form (if not exactly free form) jazz instead

Tracklist

Texas Moaner
Coal Black Shine
Last Smile Blues
Elephant Stomp Blues
Wally Plays The Blues
My Bucket's Got A Hole In It
I Double Dare You
That's The Blues Old Man
Feline Stomp
St. James Infirmary Blues
Memphis Shake
Mo Pas Lemmé Ças

Versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
PMC 1012 Humphrey Lyttelton And His Band Humph At The Conway ‎(LP) Parlophone PMC 1012 UK 1954
CLGLP 0006, CLGLP 006 Humphrey Lyttelton And His Band Humph At The Conway ‎(LP, Album, Mono, RE) Calligraph Records, Calligraph Records CLGLP 0006, CLGLP 006 UK 1986
PMC 1012 Humphrey Lyttelton And His Band Humph At The Conway ‎(LP, Album) Parlophone PMC 1012 UK Unknown
elegant stranger
This was Humph's 1954 band at its very best. The set wis ras recorded at one of the band's regular monthly concerts at Conway Hall, Red Lion Square, London. The venue was somewhat unusual in that it was not primarily intended for music,but was normally used by an organisation called the South Place Ethical Society, who held meetings and lectures there. The recording was produed by none other than George (later Sir George) Martin, who was destined to become famous for his association with the Beatles. The sound he achieved on this occasion was just right - the balance of the front line is as near perfect as can be imagined, while the rhythm section always comes over with just the right emphasis. The soloists are all at the top of their form. Humph's intro on I Double Dare You sets the mood perfectly. Wally Plays the Blues is one of the most relaxed and charming clarinet solos ever, while Johnny Parker's original, Feline Stomp, marks him out as one of the most exciting of trad pianists.Reviewing the original release in the Melody Maker, Jax Lucas wrote that he was struck as much by the weakness of the rhythm section as he was by the strength of the horns. That comment amazes me to this day - how could he get it so wrong? The rhythm section of this band was a long way ahead of those of the comparable bands of the period and on this evening they were on top form, driving the music forward in great style.