» » Franz Liszt, Alfred Brendel, Michael Gielen, Siegfried Landau - Mountain Symphony "Ce Qu'on Entend Sur La Montagne" (Symphonic Poem No.1), Music For Westchester Symphony Orchestra, Siegfried Landau, Conductor: Malediction For Piano And String Orchestra, L

Franz Liszt, Alfred Brendel, Michael Gielen, Siegfried Landau - Mountain Symphony "Ce Qu'on Entend Sur La Montagne" (Symphonic Poem No.1), Music For Westchester Symphony Orchestra, Siegfried Landau, Conductor: Malediction For Piano And String Orchestra, L FLAC album


Performer: Franz Liszt
Genre: Classical music
Title: Mountain Symphony "Ce Qu'on Entend Sur La Montagne" (Symphonic Poem No.1), Music For Westchester Symphony Orchestra, Siegfried Landau, Conductor: Malediction For Piano And String Orchestra, La Lugubre Gondola For Piano, Vienna Symphony, Michael Gielen, Conductor
Released: 1972
FLAC version ZIP size: 1353 mb
MP3 version ZIP size: 1122 mb
WMA version ZIP size: 1343 mb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 376
Other Formats: MP2 VOC DXD MP4 AA MOD MP3

A symphonic poem or tone poem is a piece of orchestral music, usually in a single continuous movement, which illustrates or evokes the content of a poem, short story, novel, painting, landscape, or other (non-musical) source. The German term Tondichtung (tone poem) appears to have been first used by the composer Carl Loewe in 1828. The Hungarian composer Franz Liszt first applied the term Symphonische Dichtung to his 13 works in this vein  . However, the stylistic distinction between symphony, "fantasy" and tone poem in Sibelius's late works becomes blurred since ideas first sketched for one piece ended up in another. One of Sibelius's greatest works, Finlandia, focuses on Finnish independence.

For Piano 4 hands (Liszt). Complete Score (. 89) - . 0MB, 38 ( pp. - . /10 2 4 6 8 10 (-) - V/V/V - 780 ⇩ - Funper. PDF scanned by Unknown Funper (2007/4/5). Themes from the symphonic poem were used by Liszt in his Andante religioso for organ (?1861–62), . 61a. Symphonic Poems by Franz Liszt. N. - Ce qu'on entend sur la montagne, . 5 ("Bergsymphonie"). - Tasso: Lamento e Trionfo, . 6. - Les préludes, . 7.

Mountain Symphony - Ce Qu'On Entend Sur La Montagne (Symphonic Poem No. 1). Conductor – Arthur Rother Orchestra – Symphony Orchestra Of Radio Berlin. B. Tasso - Lamento E Trionfo (Symphonic Poem No. 2). Conductor – Fritz ZaunOrchestra – Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. Composed By – Franz Liszt. Sleeve Notes – Peter Hugh Reed. Franz Liszt - Symphony Orchestra Of Radio Berlin, Arthur Rother, Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, Fritz Zaun - Mountain Symphony - Symphonic Poem No. 1, Tasso - Symphonic Poem No. 2 ‎(LP). Urania Records (3), Urania Records (3). US 57091, US-57091.

San Francisco Symphony (orchestra) Pierre Monteux (conductor). San Francisco: SFSO, 1950. For Piano 4 hands (Liszt). 91) - . 4MB, 34 pp. /10 2 4 6 8 10 (-) - V/V/V - 2410 ⇩ - Funper. PDF scanned by Unknown Funper (2007/4/8).

Hugo's poem ends with an air of hopelessness; in a move which would have horrified many later composers of program music, Liszt chooses to abandon the poet's ending, instead bringing the work to a close with another version of the Anchorite chorale that ended the first half

Liszt: Ce qu'on entend sur la montagne, symphonic poem No. 1, S95. 30:48. Vienna Academy Orchestra. Liszt wrote 13 symphonic poems in all, and those featured here are No. 3 - Les Preludes, No. 4 - Orpheus, and No. 1 - Berg-Symphonie. As with the previous disc the music on this volume is performed on original instruments of the 19th century. The orchestral project The Sound of Weimar will include all the orchestral works of Franz Liszt in the original orchestration of the live premieres in Weimar

Liszt: Twelve Symphonic Poems. Together with his Italian partner Mattia Ometto, the Australian Liszt expert (and piano encyclopedist) Leslie Howard plays the symphonic poems in a transcription for two pianos (by Liszt himself). A vast number of notes, and plenty of tremolo. But was it worth the effort? - Much like in the orchestral originals, there are some longueurs. Nonetheless, some truly captivating moments and fascinating structural insights make this recording well worth a listen. Liszt: Mountain Symphony, Ce qu'on entend sur la montagne.

These are forceful performances that remind us of Liszt's centrality in the history of classical music: Halasz plays up the overt debt to Berlioz in Festklänge and hammers home the point that Hunnenschlacht and Ce qu'on entend sur la montagne between them pre-empt almost every orchestral and harmonic innovation usually ascribed to Wagner, Tchaikovsky or Strauss. Halasz's approach is at times hard-driven and there are moments when he doesn't quite attain the requisite level of Romantic introspection to offset the overriding sense of monumental awe. Topics.

Tracklist

A "Ce Qu'on Entend Sur La Montagne" Symphonic Poem No.1 20:20
B1 Malediction, For Piano And String Orchestra 14:25
B2 La Lugubre Gondola, For Piano 7:00

Credits

  • Conductor – Michael Gielen, Siegfried Landau
  • Piano – Alfred Brendel

Notes

Liner notes by Richard Freed