» » Al Jolson / Arthur Fields - Tell That To The Marines / You Can't Beat Us

Al Jolson / Arthur Fields - Tell That To The Marines / You Can't Beat Us FLAC album


Performer: Al Jolson
Genre: Pop music
Title: Tell That To The Marines / You Can't Beat Us
Country: US
Released: 1918
Style: Vocal
FLAC version ZIP size: 1441 mb
MP3 version ZIP size: 1866 mb
WMA version ZIP size: 1818 mb
Rating: 4.4
Votes: 618
Other Formats: FLAC RA VOC MIDI MP2 WAV MOD

Avalon" is a 1920 popular song written by Al Jolson, Buddy DeSylva and Vincent Rose referencing Avalon, California. It was introduced by Jolson and interpolated in the musicals Sinbad and Bombo. Jolson's recording rose to number two on the charts in 1921.

That line of Hindenburg's would never break, you made a vow It must be made of rubber, Bill The way it's bending now The Krupp works that you bragged about You rave of them no more We'll change them to the bankrupt works when we end up this war So Kaiser Bill at warfare we are new If you think. now the Yankee drive is through. Well, tell that to the Marines Those deviling hounds who know what fighting means We are going to have six million men in line Kaiser Bill, if you don't think they will cross the Rhine

Al Jolson performed an early version of the song The lyrics reference the catchphrase, Tell It to the Marines, and they address Kaiser Wilhelm directly. Web site: Al Jolson- Tell that to the Marines. This article is licensed under the GNU Free Documentation License. Except where otherwise indicated, Everything.

Al Jolson wearing blackface and white gloves in The Jazz Singer, 1927. However, he is best known today for his appearance in one of the first "talkies"-The Jazz Singer-the first feature film with sound to enjoy wide commercial success, in 1927. The film is the story of a young Jewish man, Jakie Rabinowitz, who defies the traditions of his devout Jewish family when he seeks to become a popular singer of secular music. In The Jazz Singer Jolson performed the song "Mammy" in blackface. Rock-A-Bye Your Baby With A Dixie Melody (1918). Tell That to the Marines (1919). I'll Say She Does (1919). I've Got My Captain Working for Me Now (1919).

Al Jolson (May 26, 1886 – October 23, 1950) was a Russian - American singer and actor. His career lasted from 1911 until his death in 1950. He was called "the world's greatest entertainer. His singing style was "sentimental melodramatic". This style made many songs popular. Jolson influenced many famous singers. Some of these singers were Bing Crosby Judy Garland, rock and country entertainer Jerry Lee Lewis, and Bob Dylan. Dylan said Jolson was "somebody whose life I can feel".

1946 The Jolson Story - sung by Al Jolson. 1946 Margie - Sung by Jeanne Crain (dubbed by Louanne Hogan) and chorus. Tell That to the Marines". Broadway critic Gilbert Seldes compared him to the Greek god Pan, claiming that Jolson represented the concentration of our national health, in the 1930s, Jolson was Americas most famous and highest-paid entertainer. Between 1911 and 1928, Jolson had nine sell-out Winter Garden shows in a row, more than 80 hit records, and 16 national and international tours.

Tracklist

Al Jolson Tell That To The Marines
Arthur Fields You Can't Beat Us (If It Takes Ten Million More)

Versions

Category Artist Title (Format) Label Category Country Year
A2657 Al Jolson / Arthur Fields Al Jolson / Arthur Fields - Tell That To The Marines / You Can't Beat Us ‎(Shellac, 10") Columbia A2657 US 1918
A2657 Al Jolson / Arthur Fields Al Jolson / Arthur Fields - Tell That To The Marines / You Can't Beat Us ‎(Shellac, 10") Columbia A2657 US 1918
A2657 Al Jolson / Arthur Fields Al Jolson / Arthur Fields - Tell That To The Marines / You Can't Beat Us ‎(Shellac, 10", RP) Columbia A2657 USA & Canada 1919